Ellis Arnall Gubernatorial Campaign Booklet 1966

Ellis Arnall Gubernatorial Campaign Booklet 1966

As Governor from 1942-1947, Ellis Arnall was considered one of Georgia’s most progressive modern politicians. Arnall had many progressive accomplishments while in office, many of which hurt his image among white Georgians. After his tenure as governor, Arnall worked for the Truman Administration and came back to run for governor in 1966. This campaign booklet is from his 1966 run, but it highlights many of his accomplishments during his earlier career. What is different about the points Arnall highlights for his campaign? Why might Eugene Talmadge, his successor, have hated Arnall so much?

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“Manning, Selvage & Lee/ Atlanta Forward Atlanta Campaign photographs”

“Manning, Selvage & Lee/ Atlanta Forward Atlanta Campaign photographs”

The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce hired the public relations firm Manning, Selvage & Lee/Atlanta to work on the Forward Atlanta campaign. The Forward Atlanta campaign worked to bring major businesses and industries to the city. The Forward Atlanta campaign began in 1925 with a national advertising campaign and it succeeded in bringing new businesses to Atlanta. The photographs in this collection are from the second Forward Atlanta campaign launched in 1961. Similar to the first campaign, the second Forward Atlanta campaign brought another wave of new businesses that altered the Atlanta skyline. Architect John Portman’s buildings particularly reinvented the cityscape. The photographs in this collection were used to promote Atlanta to potential businesses.

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Click here to view and search the collection in the Georgia Archives

Agricultural Booklet: “Know Georgia’s Products”

Agricultural Booklet: “Know Georgia’s Products”

Population in the rural areas saw a sharp decline after WWII. Nearly 28,000 families left farming between 1945 and 1950. Although the number of farms decreased the average size of Georgia farms increased. Improvements in farming technology and techniques made farming more efficient. Farmers were encouraged to diversify their crops, prevent soil erosion, and experiment with new methods and products. Mules and plows were replaced by tractors and other motorized equipment.

“Know Georgia’s Products: Key to a New Economy.” Public Service Announcement sponsored by Rich’s Atlanta. 1946. From the Georgia Historical Society Vertical Files, Agriculture – Pamphlets Collection. 

“Agriculture in Georgia” Advertising Pamphlet

“Agriculture in Georgia” Advertising Pamphlet

Population in the rural areas saw a sharp decline after WWII. Nearly 28,000 families left farming between 1945 and 1950. Although the number of farms decreased the average size of Georgia farms increased. Improvements in farming technology and techniques made farming more efficient. From the pamphlet, what did you notice that might be helping farming develop and change since the late nineteenth century? How does this change the population of farmers?

“Agriculture in Georgia.” Atlanta : Agricultural and Industrial Development Board, 1948. From the Georgia Historical Society Rare Pamphlet Collection. F291 .G312 1948

Photograph of Construction in progress on Buford Dam

Photograph of Construction in progress on Buford Dam

In Forsyth county, the Buford Dam was completed in 1957 and created Lake Lanier and flowed into Forsyth and Hall counties. The dam was a political accomplishment, supported by Atlanta mayor William B. Hartsfield and newly elected Governor Talmadge for its benefits, such as flood control and water supplies. Moreover, technological advances made the engineering of this dam possible and successful. Lake Lanier would go on to be used not only for practical concerns, but also for enjoyment. It is frequently used for water sports and in 1996, it held the rowing, canoeing, and kayaking Olympic competitions. 

Photograph of construction on Buford Dam,
Photograph of construction on Buford Dam, Forsyth County, Georgia, ca. 1950-1953. From the Georgia Archives Vanishing Georgia Collection. hal386

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Union Bag & Paper Company Photographs

Union Bag & Paper Company Photographs

The Union Bag & Paper Company, like many companies, began hiring women during the World Wars. Based on what you learned during your time learning about World War I, what do you think happened to these women after the war? Even during the wars, who do you think might have been excluded from these formerly male-dominated jobs? How were these companies progressive in their hiring and how were they regressive during and after World War II?

McEvoy Shipyard during WWII

McEvoy Shipyard during WWII

One of the most significant contributions of Georgians to the war effort was the building of “Liberty Ships” in Savannah and Brunswick. Liberty Ships were made quickly, cheaply, and in large quantities to fill the critical need for ships to transport cargo and troops from the United States to the two war fronts. This image shows ships being built at the McEvoy Shipyard in Savannah.

McEvoy Shipyard during WWII, Collection of Photographs, 1870-1960. From the Georgia Historical Society. MS1361MP

USO Club, St. Mary’s Catholic School Dance

USO Club, St. Mary’s Catholic School Dance

The United Service Organization was created in 1941 to bring together organizations like the Salvation Army, Young Men’s Christian Association, Young Women’s Christian Association, National Catholic Community Services, National Travelers Aid Association, and the National Jewish Welfare Board. This image is from a dance at St. Mary’s Catholic School put on by a USO club in Savannah, Georgia. What is the importance of a group like USO or a dance during wartime? 

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Lamar Q. Bell Photograph Collection: World War II in Georgia.

Lamar Q. Bell Photograph Collection: World War II in Georgia.

The Georgia State Archives has digitized Lamar Q. Ball’s collection of photographs collected for his multivolume history of World War II in Georgia. The photographs depict Georgia’s contribution to World War II from manufacturing to military training. The images date from 1934 to 1945.

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Click here to view Bell’s full collection in the Georgia Archives